I love living in the Northwest because of all the green everywhere, all the time. And possibly more than I love seeing the green outside, I love bringing it inside my home. I think pretty little planters on shelves and window sills—or in this case hanging from the ceiling—are the perfect way to combat those winter blues. The original design for this project was inspired by a trip to the Volunteer Park Conservatory on Capitol Hill. Talk about bringing nature inside! Their wooden hanging planters are simply charming and made me want one of my own.

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-01.jpg#

Step 1: Make the Cuts 

Begin by cutting the 1x2s into 9 1/8” lengths (or adjust to fit your specific plant) using a chop saw. If you don't have one, you can easily make these cuts by hand with a hacksaw. You should be able to get nine pieces out of each eight-foot board. We cut a total of 18 pieces. 

Step 2: Drill 5/8” holes

Set aside two of the pieces. We won't be drilling into these ones right now. Take the other 16 pieces and measure in ¾” from both ends. Drill a hole with the 5/8” drill bit. You can use one pre-drilled piece as a guide for the rest. Stack the pre-drilled piece on top of each other piece and use the drill to mark the position of the holes on the bottom piece.

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-02.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-03.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-07.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-04.jpg#

Step 3: Sand

Sand around the edges and holes of each piece. This is just a really light sand to remove any splinters, so you don't have to put a ton of elbow grease into it.

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-09.jpg#

Step 4: Make the Bottom

Lay down two of the drilled pieces. Measure in 2½” from either end and mark with a pencil. Take the two un-drilled pieces that you set aside and lay them down perpendicularly so that the edges line up inside of these marks. Grab two drilled pieces and line up the holes with the two bottom pieces to check the distance. Adjust if needed so that a square is formed and all the corner holes line up.  Pre-drill with the 3/32” drill bit and attach with glue and 1 ¼” screws.

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-10.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-11.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-12.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-13.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-14.jpg#

Step 5: Prepare and String the Rope

Cut four equal lengths of rope to hang the planter with. Tie a knot in one end of each piece and wrap the other end with tape to make it easier to fit through the holes. Thread the top through two pre drilled pieces and then through the base you just drilled together.

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-15.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-16.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-17.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-18.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-18.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-19.jpg#

Step 6: Assemble the Planter

Layer the pieces back and forth, threading the rope through the drilled corners. We found that taping off the end of the rope help prevent fraying, making it easier to thread. For added firmness, glue in place as you go (we didn't do this).

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-21.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-21.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-24.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-25.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-28.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-26.jpg#

Step 7: Fill the Planter

Line the inside walls of the planter with moss so that it peaks out through the cracks. Place your potted plant inside and hang up to enjoy!

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-29.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-30.jpg#

Step 8: Hang the planter

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-HangingPlanter-35.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-PlanterSelects-45.jpg#

DunnDIY-SeattleWA-PlanterSelects-50.jpg#